Index

Introduction
Homeostasis
Life Span
Systems
Regulatory Functions
Nervous System
Eyes
Ears
Nose
Tongue
Brain
Endocrine System
Hypothalmus
Pituitary
Thyroid
Adrenal
Nutritional Functions
Excretary Functions
Urinary System
Kidney
Bladder
Colon
Distributive Functions
Cardiovascular System
Blood
Respiratory System
Protective Functions
Reproductive Functions
Musculo-Skeletal System
Cancer
Arthritis
Obesity
Diabetes
Cushing's Disease
Heart Disease
Teeth
Skin and Coat
Conclusion
References


Arm Your Dog Against The Effects Of Aging
Conclusion

In short, aging is a natural process. It is important to recognize that with understanding and early detection of their geriatric medical problems, dogs' useful lives may be extended, and from a humane standpoint, the quality of their later years may be increased greatly.

In the next article in this five-part series, we will address the nutritional concerns for geriatric dogs, including vitamin, mineral, protein, fat and caloric requirements, supplements and nutraceuticals. Until then, remember that in the words of the singer Tom T. Hall the only things in life "worth a solitary dime are old dogs, children and watermelon wine."

John Cargill, Retired Officer of Marines, statistician and science writer, grew up with Airedale Terriers and American Foxhounds but lives on a boat in Florida with his 5-year-old Akita, Ch. Kimdamar's Jumbalaya Jazz (call name "JJ"). He may be reached by e-mail at cargilljc@aol.com.

Susan Thorpe-Vargas has a doctorate in immunology and has an extensive chemistry and lab background. She has been involved in numerous Environmental Protection Agency cleanup sites. Susan also raises and shows Samoyeds. She may be reached by e-mail at docvite@aol.com.

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