Index

Introduction
Homeostasis
Life Span
Systems
Regulatory Functions
Nervous System
Eyes
Ears
Nose
Tongue
Brain
Endocrine System
Hypothalmus
Pituitary
Thyroid
Adrenal
Nutritional Functions
Excretary Functions
Urinary System
Kidney
Bladder
Colon
Distributive Functions
Cardiovascular System
Blood
Respiratory System
Protective Functions
Reproductive Functions
Musculo-Skeletal System
Cancer
Arthritis
Obesity
Diabetes
Cushing's Disease
Heart Disease
Teeth
Skin and Coat
Conclusion
References


Reproductive Functions

We would like to quote from an old Dog World article from 19xx: "…Don't be fooled into thinking that old dogs can't be satisfactorily used as studs. Some are just "dirty old men" with active libidos and the sperm to back it up." As with humans, old males commonly have hyperplastic prostate glands. One study suggests that 60% of all males over 8 years of age have cystic prostate hyperplasia. Most old dogs show very few symptoms.

Castration solves any problems of prostate cancers and excessive growth. Inflammation of the prostate (protatitis) is common in old males. In the female, pyometra (a uterine infection, often fatal if untreated) is relatively common. In females, the second most common form of cancer associated with aging is breast cancer, second only to various skin cancers.

If a female is otherwise healthy, her reproductive life may continue into relative old age, especially if she is of a breed that whelps easily. For both males and females, there is good scientific evidence to recommend neutering and spaying to avoid old age problems with cancers.

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