WOODHAVEN LABRADORS


Woodhaven Labradors has been in exsistance since 1974. That is when we purchased our first Lab named Woodhaven's Lady Moondance, known to her friends as Satin. She cost just $50 at the time of purchase, but well over $7000 to maintain her health over the next 14 years. She taught us you do get what you pay for and to buy from a reputable breeder. This space will help you in purchasing a puppy.


BUYING A PURE-BRED PUPPY

As with any expensive purchase, buying a pure-bred puppy requires a great deal of forethought. You must consider the care, attention and exercise required, also the costs of feeding and medical care. Remember, like most things in life, purchasing a pet has both an up side and a down side. Playing ball with your dog in the park is fun, stooping and scooping is not.

Getting a pet is not a decision to be taken lightly. Some of the questions your family should first resolve include:

Dogs have feelings too. A visit to your local Humane Society will soon impress upon you what happens to man's best friend when they are acquired in haste.

CHOOSE THE PET THAT BEST SUITS YOUR LIFESTYLE AND THE LAYOUT OF YOUR HOME

Size
A large Labrador Retriever with a thick tail is not a good idea if you live in a small condominium or apartment filled with knick-knacks. One quick sweep of the tail and Grandma's porcelain will be history.

Coat
Also consider the coat you will find on your new pet. Labradors who are inside dogs tend to shed all year long with the bulk of coat loss in spring and fall.
Perhaps you are allergic to dog hair? There are some breeds who do not loose their hair at all and are clipped instead on a regular basis.

Why buy a Pure-Bred
The advantage of a pure-bred is that they are bred to meet certain standards of size and temperament. Be sure that the breed you choose is an actual breed. There are many popular cross-breeds on the market which are often sold with the implication that they are a pure-bred dog.

What breed is best
By familiarizing yourself with your breed, you will avoid any surprises. Be sure to research your particular breed in advance. Different breeds have their own characteristics and temperament.

Shop Around
Shop around at different kennels before deciding on a puppy and try to resist the first pair of appealing brown eyes. The condition of the dogs in the kennel and the kennel itself will be an indication of the quality of the breeder. Buying a puppy is a very risky business these days. Under no circumstances do you EVER buy from a pet shop. Not even because you feel sorry for the animals.

WHAT A BREEDER SHOULD BE WILLING TO OFFER YOU (IN ADDITION TO A PUPPY)

Registration of a Pure-Bred Dog
At the time of purchase, you should receive the litter registration paper. A litter registration paper indicates the breed, date of birth, registered names and numbers of the sire and dam and the name and address of the breeder. Make sure that all the information on this paper matches the information that the breeder has told you. Beware if the birth date on the paper is not the same as the breeder has told you.
If the litter certificate is not avilable, check the individual certificates of the dam and sire to ensure that they are indeed AKC/CKC/UKC registered (or other registry) and registered in the name of their owners. Take note of their registered names and numbers. If the paper is not available ask questions as to why and when it will be available to you. If the breeder is evasive, do not buy the puppy. If the registration paper is not available, get it in writing that the breeder will send it to you within a certain amount of time (30 days) or refund fully/partially your purchase price. This is your only legal recourse.
Some breeders will not release the litter registration paper until the first 48-72 hours are over, until your check clears the bank or until you spay/neuter the dog. Again, you should have something in writing that the breeder will release the papers to you after this time.

If you are buying the puppy as a show or breeding animal, get it in writing. Any terms included with this purchase should be in writing. If the breeder guarantees the puppy for health, hips, eyes, etc, be sure to get everything in writing. Again, this is your only legal recourse.

Be aware that AKC/CKC/UKC registration (or any other registry) does not mean quality. It only means that your dog is a pure-bred. Remember, "Pet Quality" puppies should be considered as just that! Even litters from very well bred parents usually contain only a few "show or breeding" quality puppies. The rest of the litter, sold as pets can well supply the pet-buying public without any lessening of the breed standards, providing that the buyers realize that, while pure-bred, these individuals are not breeding stock. You might not be able to tell the difference between a "show or breeding quality" and a "pet quality" dog, but there are differences. Your pet will still be a delightful companion, but it might have some minor "fault" not desirable in a breeding animal. Spayed and neutered dogs make better family companions and their chances for some cancers are lessened. In fact most reputable breeders will insist that pets be sold on a spay/neuter contract or on a limited registration.

SO YOU WANT TO BE A BREEDER?

SO YOU WANT TO USE YOUR DOG AT STUD

THINGS TO THINK ABOUT BEFORE BREEDING YOUR DOG

10 REASONS NOT TO BUY A PUPPY FROM A PET SHOP

TEN COMMANDMENTS FOR PUPPY BUYERS

BUYING A PUPPY? HOW TO SELECT A BREEDER

IS THIS BREEDER REPUTABLE?

A COMPARISON OF RESPONSIBLE/HOBBY BREEDERS AND IRRESPONSIBLE/BACKYARD BREEDERS

SO YOU WANT TO BREED DOGS DO YOU?

SEVEN FOUNDATIONS FOR A SUCCESSFUL DOG BREEDER

BUYING A DOG LONG DISTANCE

MIRACLE OF BIRTH VIDEO

LAB FAQS

MAKE AN INFORMED CHOICE WHEN DECIDING ON A BREED